II-3 – The science and technology of 2D materials

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Organizers: Francesco Bonaccorso (Italian Institute of Technology), Stephan Roche (Institut Catlalà of Nanoscience), Mark Hersam (Northwestern University), Xinliang Feng (Technische Universität Dresden), Vittorio Pellegrini (Italian Institute of Technology), Clare Grey (University of Cambridge), Teofilo Rojo (CIC EnergiGUNE).

Luigi Colombo

Texas Instruments, USA

Dr. Luigi Colombo earned BS (1975) degree in Physics from Iona College (NY) and PhD (1980) degree in Materials Science from the University of Rochester (NY). He is now a TI Fellow in the Analog Technology Development group at Texas Instruments responsible for research and development of new materials and devices for analog and logic applications. He joined TI in 1981 to work on infrared detector materials where he performed research on II-VI compounds, and developed a HgCdZnTe liquid phase epitaxy process and put in production in 1991; this process is still in production today. Luigi has also developed high-k capacitor MIM structures for DRAMs, SiON/poly-Si and Hf-based high-k gate/metal transistor gate stacks for advanced transistor devices beyond the 90 nm node. He is currently responsible for the development of new materials such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenides and their integration in new device flows as part of the Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI). Over the past 8 years Luigi has developed the first CVD graphene process on Cu in collaboration with researchers at UT Austin. He has authored and co-authored over 140 refereed papers, made over 170 invited and contributed presentations, has written 4 chapters in edited books, and holds over 100 US and international patents. He is on the Strategic Advisory Council of the European Graphene Flagship, has been on the advisory board of the UC Berkeley Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science External Advisory Board, the SRC-NRI Technical Program Group, and the SRC-STARnet Strategic Advisory Board. He is also an IEEE Fellow, APS Fellow, and is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering at the University of Texas at Dallas.

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